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Net-winged Beetles Upon first glance, this beetle appears to have four sets of wings rather than two. However, the second pair of wings (in the middle) actually belong to the male, who is much smaller than the female. He&#039;s so well camouflaged and dwarfed by his mate&#039;s larger size that all we can see of him is part of his elytra and his antennae. The female was approximately 13mm, and both sexes had aposematic coloration consisting of a black and orange pattern with ridged elytra. <br />
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Female beetles of this species can mate multiple times. Each time they mate, their eggs get fertilized and any extra sperm gets stored within their bodies for future use. As their aposematic coloration suggests, Calopteron beetles have chemical defenses. They produce toxic phenols and foul-smelling pyrazines to deter predators. Also, the ridges on their elytra are brittle and rupture easily, which releases their defensive chemicals. If that&#039;s not enough to deter a predator, they can reflex-bleed from their leg joints when attacked! Banded net-winged beetle,Calopteron discrepans,Geotagged,Net-winged Beetle,Summer,United States,beetle Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Net-winged Beetles

Upon first glance, this beetle appears to have four sets of wings rather than two. However, the second pair of wings (in the middle) actually belong to the male, who is much smaller than the female. He's so well camouflaged and dwarfed by his mate's larger size that all we can see of him is part of his elytra and his antennae. The female was approximately 13mm, and both sexes had aposematic coloration consisting of a black and orange pattern with ridged elytra.

Female beetles of this species can mate multiple times. Each time they mate, their eggs get fertilized and any extra sperm gets stored within their bodies for future use. As their aposematic coloration suggests, Calopteron beetles have chemical defenses. They produce toxic phenols and foul-smelling pyrazines to deter predators. Also, the ridges on their elytra are brittle and rupture easily, which releases their defensive chemicals. If that's not enough to deter a predator, they can reflex-bleed from their leg joints when attacked!

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The banded net-winged beetle, Calopteron discrepans (Newman), is a colorful black and orange net-winged beetle commonly found resting on vegetation in moist woods throughout much of the eastern United States.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Jivko Nakev
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 27, 2018. Captured Sep 8, 2017 11:09 in 5 East St, New Milford, CT 06776, USA.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/5.6
  • 1/128s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm