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Plecia dimidiata During and after mating, pairs remain together, even in flight, for up to several days. The male with larger eyes is at the bottom of the image.<br />
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These flies are nectar and pollen feeders.<br />
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7 mm body length Australia,Diptera,Geotagged,Insect,Macro,March fly,Plecia dimidiata,Spring,arthropod,bibionidae,fauna,invertebrate,new south wales Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Plecia dimidiata

During and after mating, pairs remain together, even in flight, for up to several days. The male with larger eyes is at the bottom of the image.

These flies are nectar and pollen feeders.

7 mm body length

    comments (2)

  1. That's some rare loyalty for the insect world. The genus is even called love bugs. Cool. Posted 3 months ago
    1. I'm thinking this has to do with guarding the sperm delivered, trying to ensure it's the last the female receives before fertilization? Trying to give his sperm precedence! Posted 2 months ago

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Plecia dimidiata is a march fly that occurs in South east Australia.

Similar species: True Flies
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ruth Spigelman's profile

By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Dec 4, 2020. Captured Nov 17, 2018 14:18 in 7 Livingstone St, Merewether NSW 2291, Australia.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm